Tag Archives: prescriptivism

What I’m reading 8 Aug 2015 through 26 Aug 2015

  • The Fraught Interaction Design of Personalized Learning Products – The underfunded universities are going to paying a lot for suggestions about time management from the machine. And are students going take those suggestions or are teachers setting up to enforce them? Ah, you make learning fun!

    "the perceived value of the product is directly related to the confidence that students and teachers have that the product is rendering an accurate diagnosis. That’s why I think products that provide black box diagnoses are doomed to market failure in the long term. As the market matures, students and teachers are going to want to know not only what the diagnosis is but what the basis of the diagnosis is, so that they can judge for themselves whether they think the machine is correct." – (de d2l prescriptivism predictive )

  • ELO 2015: The End(s) of Electronic Literature August 5. – Just in case you missed it: streams from the ELO, Bergen, Aug 2015 – (DH ELO )
  • elearnspace › White House: Innovation in Higher Education – Seimens's blog report on a secret White House thinktank with the for-profit education sector. Watch your back. The private sector wants your tax dollars. – (education disruption )

on pinboard for March 22nd, 2014 through March 26th, 2014

  • A Pragmatics of Links | Tosca | Journal of Digital Information – "This paper applies the linguistic theory of relevance to the study of the way links work, insisting on the lyrical quality of the link-interpreting activity. It is argued that such a pragmatic approach can help us understand hypertext readers` behavior, and thus be useful for authors and tool-builders alike." Read alongside Burbles. Rhetorics of the web. – (dh hypertext hypertextessay hypernarrative )
  • Are ‘grammar Nazis’ ruining the English language? – Telegraph – A light introduction to the focus of linguistics and the Language Log. Followed by 100s of inane comments. "Despite what many people think, the rules of a language – any language – are only defined by how people use that language. When you think about it, that has to be the case: the rules of English are different now from how they were in Milton’s time, let alone Chaucer’s, and no one has ever sat down and deliberately changed them; they’ve changed because the language has evolved, through changing use. Pullum’s job is determining what those rules are." – (linguistics grammar prescriptivism )

bookmarks for December 10th, 2012