Tag Archives: plagiarism

What I’m reading 20 Jul 2016 through 28 Jul 2016

  • Context, Commentary, and Close Reading: What Slate’s Annotated “Bartelby” Can Tell Us About Reading and Writing with Digital Annotation – > the already-annotated text (like Kahn’s “Bartelby”) is good for some kinds of reading, but not others. Specifically, while digital annotation overcomes some of the barriers to readerly engagement with a complex text, like lack of historical knowledge and interpretive experience, it also short-circuits the kind of intensive or “close” reading traditionally valued in literary studies. But the process of annotation modeled here helps productively deconstruct the writing/reading dichotomy, at the same time activating both close and contextual reading. “Bartelby” offers a useful model for how digital annotation tools and practices can be productively used in the writing classroom. – (notetaking annotation erhetoric )
  • elearnspace › Adaptive Learners, Not Adaptive Learning – > This is where adaptive learning fails today: the future of work is about process attributes whereas the focus of adaptive learning is on product skills and low-level memorizable knowledge. I’ll take it a step further: today’s adaptive software robs learners of the development of the key attributes needed for continual learning – metacognitive, goal setting, and self-regulation – because it makes those decisions on behalf of the learner. – (adaptivelearning )
  • The extent of Melania’s plagiarism – How to chart plagiarism – (plagiarism fyc )

What I’m reading 12 Jul 2015 through 15 Jul 2015

  • Technology Fails Plagiarism, Citation Tests – "plagiarism detection software is being unmasked as not as effective as using browser search engines." But with Turnitin, you don't actually have to read the paper. Maybe I'm cynical, but I'm thinking we don't trust our own judgements. But the better argument is this,

    "Both plagiarism detection and citation software are harbingers of the dangers of seeking shortcuts for teaching students any aspect of writing; spending school or university funds on these inadequate technologies, I think, is hard to defend, but the greater pedagogical problem is how technology often serves to impede, not strengthen our roles as educators—especially as teachers of writing. – (plagiarism fyw )

  • Fear and Loathing of the English Passive – Geoffrey Pullum – Pullum clarifies use of the passive in English. Makes one glad to be alive. – (grammar usage syntax strunknwhite )
  • Human Resources and Thought Control – Lingua Franca – Geoffrey Pullum – Another strike at the gramma and umbrage gang. This time it's a matter of getting a focus: Don't try to change the language – change the damn HR policies.

    "My point is that either it’s right to try to reshape people’s thinking by sculpting their phraseology or it isn’t. If it isn’t, then Orwell shouldn’t have been trying to manipulate our political perception through linguistic revision. But if it is, then HR people are not doing anything wrong by following Orwell’s example.

    You can’t have it both ways: Thought control through word or phrase eradication… can’t be uncritically regarded as right when Orwell does it but automatically condemned as wrong when your employer does it. That’s begging the question." – (grammar standards strunknwhite )

on pinboard for February 16th, 2014 through February 17th, 2014

bookmarks for February 13th, 2013 through February 15th, 2013

bookmarks for January 12th, 2013 through January 14th, 2013

bookmarks for April 17th through May 26th

A catch-up post while reactivating postalicious.

beg, borrow, and deal

More on Turnitin: Buying Its Way Onto the Program? :: Inside Higher Ed :: Higher Education’s Source for News, and Views and Jobs.

If you notice more positive discussion of plagiarism-detection software at next year’s meeting, in San Francisco, it might be because Turnitin.com is hoping to pay for some instructors to go there. The company sent out an e-mail message this week to professors at colleges that use the popular service, telling them that if they apply to be on a panel at the conference to talk about plagiarism-detection services, the company will consider paying for them to go. The company also asked that instructors send it copies of their proposed papers — but the company didn’t inform the 4C’s (as the association is known), which will be judging proposed topics.

Officials of Turnitin.com said that they were just trying to counter what happens at some meetings where you “just hear the negative,” in the words of Katie Povejsil, vice president of marketing for iParadigms, the company that owns Turnitin.com.

What’s interesting is that Turnitin has discredited any positive review or consideration of their software. But maybe that’s their intent.

plagiarism