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on pinboard for April 25th, 2014 through April 29th, 2014

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bookmarks for October 8th, 2013 through October 12th, 2013

  • Wikipedia:Too long; didn’t read – don't often bookmark Wikipedia, but this entry is a valuable reminder. "A common mis-citation of this essay is to ignore the reasoned and actually quite clear arguments and requests for response presented by an unnecessarily wordy editor with a flippant "TL;DR" in an attempt to discredit and refuse to address their strongly-presented ideas and/or their criticism of one's own position. This is a four-fold fallacy: ad hominem, appeal to ridicule, thought-terminating cliché, and simple failure to actually engage in the debate because one is supposedly too pressed for time to bother, the inverted version of proof by verbosity." – (erhetoric sarcasim )
  • The biggest lesson from the flipped classroom – At least one substantive observation about flipping classrooms: it ain't about just getting by. "it rejects the notion that college is about just barely getting by in the nick of time, and instead it promotes a personal model of staying on top of things and getting things done. This is  a form of self-regulated learning and something university students must absolutely master at some point, sooner rather than later."

    But I wonder if this can be addressed simply by teaching students time management. – (flippedcourse de )

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bookmarks for July 19th, 2013 through July 22nd, 2013

  • ‘Introduction to Ancient Rome,’ the Flipped Version – Commentary – Observations on flipping. An observation on outsourcing content

    "But in the humanities, at least, a flipped class is unlikely to work very well with content created by someone other than the instructor because doing so reduces the instructor's authority in the eyes of the students. Mohamed Noor, a biology professor at Duke University, used his own Coursera course to flip his campus-based course. But I suspect that the flipped class would have been substantially less successful if he had been required to use someone else's lectures and other course materials as the "textbook" of his own course.

    "In basic terms, every instructor tells his or her own story with the course content. Not only is that part of the fun, but it's the place where our research intersects with our teaching. Furthermore, students tell us that an essential component of a successful flipped class is a strong connection between in-class and outside-of-class activities."

    And another about generic activities –
    "Another key secret about flipping a class: Content delivery is the easy part. The hard part is figuring out what to do in class that keeps students engaged, and motivated to prepare for class. In other words, they have to come to see the value of doing assigned pre-class work and then see that coming to class is an efficient way to learn (or, more precisely, to earn high grades). It will take considerable effort and resources, not to mention additional classroom support staff in larger classes, to run pedagogically sound flipped classes. It will take a lot of energy to develop activities that work for one's particular audience—and what works for my group may well not work for a class at Haverford or Yale. – (xmooc flippedcourse DH outsourcing )

  • Student Reading Practices in Print and Electronic Media – "The research found that they almost always used e-book readers, mobile devices, and tablet computers for nonacademic reading but relied on paper printouts for academic reading." and "Perhaps most notably, many of the study participants said they saw themselves as belonging to the generation before the first truly digital generation. " from the Chronicle report on the work. <http:></http:>
    – (none)
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bookmarks for May 24th, 2013 through May 27th, 2013

  • Teachers and Students: Machines and their Products? – "A great deal of what today’s education “reformers” believe is based on the idea that every student is a nascent autodidact. The only thing they are missing is opportunity. Most people, including most children, however, don’t see themselves as “starved” for knowledge or learning. They are getting along quite fine with what they have, thank you." – (xmooc edreform fyc )
  • Musicianship Resources – Git Hosted – Interesting for two things: explanation of the practices of the flipped course, and hosting the resources as a blog on GitHub. Oh, and for the design of the materials, too. – (blog github OER flippedcourse )
  • A Course in Online Civility – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education – An odd one, where online discussions actually occur and with some politeness. The value points are in Goedde's connection of discourse form – rant, off-hand comment – with lack of development. "Students disagree with each other, sometimes strongly, but they also take pains to be polite.

    Their motivation is clear: Their grade depends on it. In my online classes, every assignment, big and small, is written. If the writing is sloppy or dogmatic, it doesn't earn a high grade. For example, students routinely give feedback on one another's drafts. If a student responds with a rant, either in support or opposition, it typically means the ideas are not organized, so I take off points. If a student's comments are offhanded, it typically means that the ideas are underdeveloped, or that claims are made without evidence to support them, and the grade reflects this shortcoming." – (netiquette fyc dialogue )