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bookmarks for November 9th, 2010 through November 13th, 2010

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bookmarks for October 12th, 2010 through October 16th, 2010

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bookmarks for April 25th, 2010

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bookmarks for July 31st, 2009

  • Joho the Blog » Transparency is the new objectivity – Dave Weinberger. "transparency is now fulfilling some of objectivity’s old role in the ecology of knowledge." that is, "Transparency gives the reader information by which she can undo some of the unintended effects of the ever-present biases. Transparency brings us to reliability the way objectivity used to." – (web2.0 epistemology journalism )
  • apophenia: Would the real social network please stand up? – "Not all social networks are the same.
    You cannot assume network transitivity.
    You cannot assume that properties that hold for one network apply to other networks.
    To address this, I want to begin by mapping out three distinct ways of modeling a social network. These are not the only ways of modeling a social network, but they are three common ways that are often collapsed in public discourse." – (twitter facebook socialnetworking socialpractices )
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bookmarks for July 19th, 2009

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bookmarks for April 17th through May 26th

A catch-up post while reactivating postalicious.

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Blogging New Media Print Culture

link journalism and rhetorical work

Just a few rhetorical notes on this (relatively) new meme.

From an elearninspace post

Perhaps the most significant contribution the web has made to society – outside of providing increased access to information – is the forced consideration of perspectives and opinions outside of our own. While we might not always take advantage of it, each link is a simple access point to a new perspective. We can build echo chambers if we so desire, but the ability to encounter random views and perspectives is valuable and worth pursuing in its own right. A similar occurrence in traditional media.

which led me to an example of what Scott Karp at Publishing 2.0 sees as link journalism at The Lede, and his commentary:

Nizza isn’t just lazily linking to these stories — he’s read them, compared them, identified shortcomings, extracted key facts and issues, and connected the dots.

In a traditional newspaper article, all of these facts and analysis would have been synthesized, but the reader wouldn’t have had the opportunity to read for themselves the source material. This post does what journalism is supposed to do — empower people with facts, understanding, and perspective about important issues.

and back to consider elearnspace:

the ability to encounter random views and perspectives is valuable and worth pursuing in its own right.

Links, wherever and however included, don’t present random views or perspectives. They are select, and selected. – even in a google search. Link journalism ups its ethos and illustrates its logos by linking (Karp is persuaded to value Nizza’s post by the rhetorical work Nizza has done in drawing the sources together). Linking might make it possible for readers to look at the evidence and come to different conclusions, but the linker is still in control, presenting, at best, a multiple set of vital perspectives, but still a contained set; and presenting a rationale, more or less out in the open, as to why these links, this evidence, are important, and how this evidence is best interpreted. The dots are selected from a background of dots, and they are connected to show a coherent image – and not another, possibly equally coherent, persuasive image.

Link journalism, that is, is no less a matter of management than any other form of persuasion. And that makes it really really interesting.