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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for May 8th, 2012 through May 9th, 2012

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for February 9th, 2012 through February 10th, 2012

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for February 6th, 2012

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for January 30th, 2012 through February 1st, 2012

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for January 11th, 2012

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for June 23rd, 2011 through July 29th, 2011

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for June 1st, 2011 through June 2nd, 2011

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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for May 29th, 2011

  • Digital Breadcrumbs, Purdy and Walker – Framed in a google search clone. "We call for examining the ways in which researchers actually use online resources for scholarly projects rather than lamenting how these researchers are not following prescribed models of efficient, purposeful online research. We, in other words, seek to consider the value of researchers' existing practices. In this early research, we find that for the participant-researchers in this study:

    Multiple online resources are used together in unadvertised, collaborative ways.
    “Unstructured” online research can be inventional." – (a&e research academia2.0 research2.0 mooc ple )

  • Why the Future of College isn’t on Campus | Brazen Life – Short post that will be good to critique in A&E. Lovely little half-truths, gross generalizations, even some bullet-proofing of arguments – all make it attractive to buy into, but weak and in the end, nothing new. Can also come at this from a distortion of ethos: apparent practical wisdom that is built of unquestioned aphorisms and placebos. Can see it by asking if the ethos is open to an alternative. Mis-leading title: this is back focused, not future. Nothing new here. Summed up in: Yes, it's apparent in your writing that you learned very little in college. – (a&e fyc argument fallacious bulletproofing tribalism )
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Pinboard Bookmarks

bookmarks for December 9th, 2010 through December 10th, 2010

  • Picturing social order – – (visualization )
  • From Indymedia to Wikileaks – OWNI.eu weighs in. “The battle over Wikileaks, and the journalistic questions that it raises, are genuinely new developments — but they’re new developments grounded in a few long term trends and a history stretching back nearly two decades.The impact of WikiLeaks on journalism is more an impact of degree than of kind; what’s happening isn’t entirely new, but it is happening on a greater scale than ever before. – (wikileaks journalism newjournalism )
  • Twelve Theses on Wikileaks (with Patrice Riemens – [via if:books]. 12 entry points to the WikiLeaks discussion. From Amsterdam, it reads like an internal Pentagon report. “We do not think that taking a stand for or against WikiLeaks is what matters most. WikiLeaks is here to stay, until it either scuttles itself or is destroyed by opposing forces. Our point is rather to (try to) assess and ascertain what WikiLeaks can, could — and maybe even should — do, and to help formulate how “we” could relate to and interact with WikiLeaks.” – (wikileaks anarchy fyw a&e newjournalism citizen_journalism )
  • 500 Internal Server Error – 500 Internal Server Error – (none)
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The University

MOOCs and the stock university course #plenk2010

A first consideration of adapting MOOC techniques to the stock university situation.

Have a look at these notes on Stephen Downes’s presentation.

The more I’m immersed in the PLENK course and material, the more possibilities I see for driving MOOC teaching techniques and approaches into the stock university courses I teach.

For instance, we have new a sophomore level Argument and Exposition course (A&E. Gotta like the double joke in that course title) for learning research practices. Downes’s example of how to find a niche and set up a PLE suggests that I can adapt MOOC practices into a course project. The course wouldn’t be a MOOC (maybe a Minimal Open Online Project), and I would have to evaluate the students in the end. But this approach gives students the opportunity to develop tacit practices – both of research and of the subject they are studying with their PLEs. What they create along the way – the blog posts, delicious links, google feeds, and the artifacts they create and post – along with some periodic reflective posts or discussions, provide plenty of material to evaluate the learner, and plenty of material for my supervisors to evaluate the course.

Students will be on their own when it comes to the kinds of activities they take on, the kind of artifacts they create. They may have to learn how to edit and upload videos, they may have to figure out how to share a scanner, and I can see having to have students create their own support network in for the course itself, but that’s part of the beauty of the thing.

What’s in it for us?

  • Not less instructional time, but both students and I get to spend our instructional time differently than we have for the past bunch of years.
  • Less classroom time and more learning time for students.
  • Less lecture prep time because less lecture and more practice time for all.
  • Students might start to learn what it means – tacitly –  to take control of their own learning. Need to measure this.
  • Relatively safe experience in facilitating a MOOC-like course. The course provides my own scaffolding for a more complex move in the future.
  • If it works, a pretty impressive demonstration of an alternative to using D2L.

What’s needed?

As Stephen mentions, The Daily is vital to the movement and maintaining participation in the course. The Daily motivates. The Daily holds participants accountable. I could probably monitor student feeds in my own google reader account, but I’ll probably have to install gRSShopper on Dreamhost.

What else is needed?

Probably an intensive first week or two in getting students to re-conceptualize how the class will progress, and get them comfortable with the approach. Probably need to survey what kinds of online work students already do and get them comfortable sharing that expertise. Probably have to provide some early support for getting RSS feeds together. Probably have to really work on getting students to take responsibility for their learning, for creating and submitting stuff regularly  – and it needs to be regular so that they have a better chance of passing the final evaluation.

Seems worth it so far.