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Reading: Tropes and Networked Digital Activism #3: How Fact-Checkers Use Knowledge of Tropes to Fact-Check Quickly (and how you could too) | Hapgood

From Tropes and Networked Digital Activism #3: How Fact-Checkers Use Knowledge of Tropes to Fact-Check Quickly (and how you could too) | Hapgood

Mike uses the algorithm to find instances (what makes a falsehood effective and spread is its formula, which can be used to signal the spread), and offers a way to deal with the propaganda:

And here’s where we find perhaps one application of all this theory around a trope-focused approach. Because what if instead of focusing on truth or falsity of content early in a cycle we focused on providing the sort of trope-specific context fact-checkers bring to the table? We don’t have the fact-check yet — but we do have the history of the trope that informs their plausibility judgments. We know for example that this trope of the “ballot-discarding public official” will appear in 2022 and 2024, and that we’ll go through the same pattern of discovering it and taking so long to disconfirm it that any subsequent actions are rendered meaningless. But what if in the meantime you could ask everyone liking it and sharing it to read a short history of the trope, and the ways its been used in the past. If they still want to tweet it after knowing that hey, this is the same scam people fell for three elections in a row, then okay, go ahead.