Tag Archives: trump

What I’m reading 28 May 2018

  • [toread] Trump’s bizarre understanding of Capitalization is surprisingly Strategic – The Washington Post – Set aside the idea that it had to do with monetary capitalization.

    > Initial capitals make words and ideas seem Really Important. They are to meaning-making what flag pins are to patriotism and gold-plating is to value — cheap signals of depth and quality that are somehow taken seriously by enormous numbers of people. (How seriously? There’s not one but two PolitiFact articles dedicated to discussions of Obama’s pin philosophy.) This capitalization technique is common in get-rich-quick and quack medicine books desperate to sell readers on the Truth of their claims. – (rhetoric linguistics trump capitalization )

What I’m reading 21 May 2018

  • Trump Only Has One Scandal – The Atlantic – Slouching towards Bethlehem. The act of fascism gives way to grounds of fascism.

    > There are not many Trump scandals. There is one Trump scandal. Singular: the corruption of the American government by the president and his associates, who are using their official power for personal and financial gain rather than for the welfare of the American people, and their attempts to shield that corruption from political consequences, public scrutiny, or legal accountability. – (trump corruption rhetoric )

What I’m reading 21 May 2018

  • Trump Demands an Official Investigation of Obama White House – The Atlantic – Trump found a loophole. Now he needs to find a few corrupt friends will to drive through it for him. But the story is in the interpretation of the tweet: – how the doj interprets “look into.”

    > This is a nakedly corrupt attempt on the part of the president to discredit and derail an investigation of himself at the expense of a human intelligence source to whose protection the FBI and DOJ are committed. My colleague at Lawfare, Quinta Jurecic, and I fleshed out the history of this saga and warned, “Don’t underestimate this episode. It will have a long tail and big consequences—all of them terrible.”

    > The idea that the president doesn’t interfere in law-enforcement investigative matters is one of our deep normative expectations of the modern presidency. But it is not a matter of law. … The only real restraint on the president—other than his own conscience and political pressures—in dipping down into the FBI and Justice Department and directing investigations for his own personal purposes is the willingness of senior law-enforcement officials to carry out improper orders. – (trump rhetoric hermaneutics )

What I’m reading 19 May 2018

  • Rebecca Solnit: The Coup Has Already Happened | Literary Hub – Anxiety arrives.

    > After the coup, everything seems crazy, the news is overwhelming, and some try to cope by withdrawing or pretending that things are normal. Others are overwhelmed and distraught. I’m afflicted by a kind of hypervigilance of the news, a daily obsession to watch what’s going on that is partly a quest for sense in what seems so senseless. At least I’ve been able to find the patterns and understand who the key players are, but to see the logic behind the chaos brings you face to face with how deep the trouble is.

    > We still have an enormous capacity to resist the administration, not least by mass civil disobedience and other forms of noncooperation. Sweeping the November elections wouldn’t hurt either, if that results in candidates we hold accountable afterward. Or both. I don’t know if there’s a point at which it will be too late, though every week more regulations, administrators, and norms crash and burn—but we are long past the point at which it is too soon. – (trump )

What I’m reading 11 Mar 2018 – 21 Apr 2018

What I’m reading 8 Feb 2018 – 9 Mar 2018

What I’m reading 29 Oct 2017 – 6 Feb 2018

McLuhan on the Headline

Head Line: a primitive shout of rage and fear

  • Wares and rumors of wares in a time of Trump.
  • The story content becomes the merchandise.

[T]he headline is a feature which began with the Napoleonic Wars. The headline is a primitive shout of rage, triumph, fear, or warning, and newspapers have thrived on wars ever since. And the newspaper, with two or three decks of headlines, has also become a major weapon. …

Any kind of excitement or emotion contributes to the possibility of dangerous explosions when the feelings of huge populations are kept inflamed even in peacetime for the sake of the advancement of commerce. Headlines mean street sales. It takes emotion to move merchandise. And wars and rumors of wars are the merchandise and also the emotion of the popular press.

From The Mechanical Bride

Update 11 Dec 2017: Any kind of excitement.  In a post-simulacrum world, the quote itself is verification enough.

“Think of each presidential day as an episode in a television show in which he vanquishes rivals.”  

Trump, as reported, in the NYT

 

 

What I’m reading 27 Oct 2017 – 28 Oct 2017

What I’m reading 20 Sep 2017 – 5 Oct 2017