Tag Archives: socialpractices

What I’m reading 11 May 2017 through 16 May 2017

What I’m reading 28 May 2015 through 9 Jun 2015

  • Re-imagining Twitter – Example of how making it complex changes its potential. There's nothing intuitive about categories and stories: they are social concepts imported to bootstrap connection. What they do is make contextual information explicit rather than implicit. That adds to what can be carried by 140 characters. Ease of use gives way to augmentation. The link to lowercase capital in the subhead of the article is both a prominent move and a declaration of alignment (calling attention to itself *because* it's in the subhead). If we make it more complex, more people will use it! – (augmentation twitter socialmedia socialpractices erhetoric )
  • What’s Your Algorithmic Citizenship? | Citizen Ex – A Chrome extension that records (locally) the physical location of the servers that hold the sites you visit. We have defined identity by place and origin. What happens when we become visitors? A DH project by James Bridle, co-commissioned by The space and the Southbank Centre. I'm in. – (DH identity geolocation geopsycology )
  • Writing, Unteachable or Mistaught? – – (comp_theory )

bookmarks for May 8th, 2012 through May 9th, 2012

bookmarks for April 8th, 2011

bookmarks for November 5th, 2010 through November 6th, 2010

bookmarks for September 8th, 2010 through September 14th, 2010

yet another promise to post

Paul Carr at TechCrunch makes some sharp observations on the appeal of immediacy over the hard grind of reflection in Thnks Fr Th Mmrs: The Rise Of Microblogging, The Death Of Posterity.

A decade or so ago, a new generation who would previously have kept diaries instead started to set up blogs. Sure those blogs may have been twee or self-absorbed or clumsily written or emo or just plain boring – isn’t that the joy of a diary? – but they at least required the writer to take the time to process the events of their life, and the attendant emotions they generated – before putting finger to keyboard. The result, in many cases, was a detailed archive of events and memories that they can look back on now and say “that was how I was then”.

And then along came micro-blogging – and, with a finite amount of time and effort available, the blog generation turned into the Twitter (or Facebook) generation. A million blogs withered and died as their authors stopped taking the time to process their thoughts and switched instead to simply copying and pasting them into the world, 140 meaningless characters at a time. The result: a whole lot of sound and mundanity, signifying nothing.

I haven’t been an enthusiastic microblogger, so I don’t need to back away from Twitter much, I’ve already let my Tumblr account go dormant, and I just don’t find Facebook rewarding and so rarely visit But the piece is a reminder to get something extended and thoughtful – or even trite – posted regularly. And, I’d add, posted to one place. Along with the brevity, the scatteredness of the sites to post to makes creating a record difficult.

bookmarks for August 18th, 2010 through August 20th, 2010

things we would never put on the university home page

This graphic has been making the rounds.  I found it on The Bamboo Project Blog: It’s About Answering Their Questions, Stupid: What Goes on the First Page ? – where I find a lot of Good Stuff.  The reminder that Michele gives:

[W]e still have this broadcast notion of content that can trip us up at the oddest moments. We need to stop thinking that social media–or any online content, for that matter–is first and foremost about us. The best stuff is always, always about our users.

If we could only get our PR/Communications people to hear that, we’d see an improvement in BSU’s little website – an improvement that the students who use the site – and those who never enrolled because the couldn’t find what they were looking for at a university – could then carry forward into their professions. [Warning: Don’t expect any of the following on our front page.]

University_website

But design, it’s really about control, isn’t it?