Tag Archives: en3177

What I’m reading 29 Jan 2017 through 6 Feb 2017

  • Vie and deWinter – Disrupting Intellectual Property, from Wikis in Composition – For teachers mainly. > By challenging the authority of the single authorial voice, wikis also call into question traditional notions of intellectual property as a market commodity. These notions propagate the argument that ideas are a unique product of individual labor and can thus “belong” to a single person. It may be precisely because wikis challenge these established notions that some student users resist their use in the classroom. In keeping with this general theme, the questions that guide our research are as follows: What is the currency of intellectual property in the university setting? Do wikis, in fact, disrupt established, dominant notions of intellectual property? – (wiki en3177 collaboration collaborativewriting copyright )
  • The Peek-a-Boo World of a Global Villager – The Hawk’s Roost – Connects Blood, Rettberg, and McLuhan in the social media village:

    > Does the disciplined approach, which blogging in its intended form is described as possessing, offer the solution to legitimizing the discussions we as a society are having. Am I wrong in sensing that social media has become plagued with a lack of ethical discourse, where important social issues are overwhelmed with copious amounts of misinformation. Where the atmosphere is clouded with an overall lack of informational credibility? – (weblogs )

  • Trump’s America, where even park employees have become enemies of the state | Sarah Kendzior | Opinion | The Guardian – A consideration of Trump's alternative facts and their rhetorical use.

    > What Americans have learned is that our system of checks and balances is so weak that even parks employees can become enemies of the state. They are learning their rights as they lose them, grieving for what they once took for granted. Fear is matched by incredulity that hundreds of years of imperfect democracy could cede into autocracy with such ease. Trump’s win was followed by debate over what it means to live in a “post-facts” world. This was a fatuous debate: if facts did not matter, then Trump and his team, whose threats of punishment and litigation long preceded his official lock on power, would not work so hard to suppress them. The idea of a fact always mattered – it simply had to be the Trump administration’s facts that counted. Trump’s adviser, Kellyanne Conway, made this blatant last weekend when she stated that the administration would proffer “alternative facts” that justified its political aims. – (politics rhetoric trump )

What I’m reading 15 Jan 2017 through 24 Jan 2017

  • Getting Started on Academic Twitter v2.0 – A current introduction and advice. – (twitter en3177 )
  • Editing wars at London Bridge Street – When procedures are offered up as irony, it's art. – (strunknwhite grammar )
  • The Music Donald Trump Can’t Hear – The New Yorker – The New Yorker weighs in on authoritarianism in the 21st century: "at that terrifying first press conference of Trump’s, on Wednesday, we saw the looming face of pure authoritarianism. Rewards are promised to the obedient: those good states that voted the right way, the “responsible” press. Punishments are threatened to the bad: “They’re going to suffer the consequences!” Intimidation is the greeting to any critic. And look! There’s a claque alongside to cheer the big boss and deride his doubters. This is what was once called Bonapartism: I won and I can now do anything I choose. Victory, however narrow, is license for all. Autocracy, after all, has always been compatible with plebiscitary endorsement. The point of constitutional government is to make even the victors subject to the rules." – (authoritarianism politics trump )

What I’m reading 7 Jan 2017 through 13 Jan 2017

What I’m reading 19 Mar 2016 through 22 Mar 2016

  • The Purpose of Online Discussion – Hybrid Pedagogy – Whether this article addresses the matter of //purpose// is open, but there is this matter of mediation rephrased: "While the introjection of machines is an interesting opportunity for further educational research, as an instructor, plan for student participation with this in mind: they are interacting with a machine and not people. An online discussion is more like a computer’s lecture than an IRL discussion, no matter how interactive."

    Mediation is opportunity. So suggests McLuhan. – (cmc de )

  • How Will Keeping A Notebook Help You Hack Your Life – WebSeitz/wiki – Bill Seitz on using a wiki as a notebook. It's more than a hack. It's a way of life. – (en3177 notebooks notetaking DH )
  • ‘I Love My Label’: Resisting the Pre-Packaged Sound in Ed-Tech – Tapping into a volume of historical data, the predictive algorithm guides course selection in a way that improves academic success and drives on-time degree completion.” But just like the predictive modeling in music, this process should prompt us to ask a lot of questions about what feeds that algorithm and what are the results: What sorts of classes get recommended? Are students offered something that sounds familiar, comfortable? What signals to the algorithm what a student might find familiar? What happens in the face of an algorithmic education to intellectual curiosity? To risk-taking, to exploration, experimentation, play? To the major that many of us pursue for a while, “Undecided.” Does the educational system as-is, with or without an algorithm, value these things? And what happens when classes are devised in order to perform well according to this algorithm? – (corporateculture d2l )

What I’m reading 28 Feb 2016 through 4 Mar 2016

What I’m reading 13 Feb 2016 through 20 Feb 2016

What I’m reading 27 Jan 2016 through 30 Jan 2016

What I’m reading 18 Jan 2016 through 25 Jan 2016

What I’m reading 15 Jan 2016 through 17 Jan 2016

What I’m reading 9 Jan 2016

  • Kathleen Fitzpatrick – The Pleasure of the Blog: e Early Novel, the Serial, and the Narrative Archive – – (DH #en3177 en3177 )
  • Jan Schmidt – Blogging Practices: An Analytical Framework – "This article proposes a general model to analyze and compare different uses of the blog format. Based on ideas from sociological structuration theory, as well as on existing blog research, it argues that individual usage episodes are framed by three structural dimensions of rules, relations, and code, which in turn are constantly (re)produced in social action. As a result, ‘‘communities of blogging practices’’ emerge-that is, groups of people who share certain routines and expectations about the use of blogs as a tool for information, identity, and relationship management. This analytical framework can be the basis for systematic comparative and longi- tudinal studies that will further understanding of similarities and differences in blog- ging practices. – (#en3177 blogging analysis literacy )
  • I am a blogging researcher: Motivations for blogging in a scholarly context | Kjellberg | First Monday – The number of scholarly blogs on the Web is increasing. In this article, a group of researchers are asked to describe the functions that their blogs serve for them as researchers. The results show that their blogging is motivated by the possibility to share knowledge, that the blog aids creativity, and that it provides a feeling of being connected in their work as researchers. In particular, the blog serves as a creative catalyst in the work of the researchers, where writing forms a large part, which is not as prominent as a motivation in other professional blogs. In addition, the analysis brings out the blog’s combination of functions and the possibility it offers to reach multiple audiences as a motivating factor that makes the blog different from other kinds of communication in scholarly contexts. – (DH #en3177 blogging research2.0 ethnography )