What I’m reading 25 Mar 2016 through 26 Mar 2016

What I’m reading 19 Mar 2016 through 22 Mar 2016

  • The Purpose of Online Discussion – Hybrid Pedagogy – Whether this article addresses the matter of //purpose// is open, but there is this matter of mediation rephrased: "While the introjection of machines is an interesting opportunity for further educational research, as an instructor, plan for student participation with this in mind: they are interacting with a machine and not people. An online discussion is more like a computer’s lecture than an IRL discussion, no matter how interactive."

    Mediation is opportunity. So suggests McLuhan. – (cmc de )

  • How Will Keeping A Notebook Help You Hack Your Life – WebSeitz/wiki – Bill Seitz on using a wiki as a notebook. It's more than a hack. It's a way of life. – (en3177 notebooks notetaking DH )
  • ‘I Love My Label’: Resisting the Pre-Packaged Sound in Ed-Tech – Tapping into a volume of historical data, the predictive algorithm guides course selection in a way that improves academic success and drives on-time degree completion.” But just like the predictive modeling in music, this process should prompt us to ask a lot of questions about what feeds that algorithm and what are the results: What sorts of classes get recommended? Are students offered something that sounds familiar, comfortable? What signals to the algorithm what a student might find familiar? What happens in the face of an algorithmic education to intellectual curiosity? To risk-taking, to exploration, experimentation, play? To the major that many of us pursue for a while, “Undecided.” Does the educational system as-is, with or without an algorithm, value these things? And what happens when classes are devised in order to perform well according to this algorithm? – (corporateculture d2l )

What I’m reading 7 Mar 2016 through 16 Mar 2016

What I’m reading 5 Mar 2016 through 7 Mar 2016

  • Should Academics Talk to Katie Couric? – The Chronicle – Once more into the breech of consumption. Don't make me think! "Academic writing has the benefit of scholarly rigor, full documentation, and original thinking. But the transmission of our ideas is routinely hampered — understandably, given academe’s publication, evaluation, and tenure conditions — by a great deal of peer-oriented jargon." – (rhetoric academicwriting scholarship2.0 )
  • Coming Down From the Clouds: On Academic Writing – The Chronicle – A defense rather than an apologia for scholarly writing. We're not writing for The General Public. We're writing on the edge of knowledge – and that requires some effort. "Yes, some academic writing is more abstruse than it needs to be. No doubt, scholarship should not be hidden behind expensive paywalls. And, yes, academics, like all people, are shaped by the conditions of their employment. … But the story is more complicated." "there is a risk when we mistakenly assume that public and scholarly writing are the same thing — that one is good and clear and the other is needlessly complex." – (scholarship2.0 composition academia2.0 academicwriting )
  • Fear of Screens – The New Inquiry – Jurgenson, review of Reclaiming Conversation, Turkle. "Why would anyone want to believe that people who are communicating with phones have forgotten what friendship is?" My notes on http://mcmorgan.wikity.cc/digital-dualism/ – (mediation identity semiotics )

What I’m reading 28 Feb 2016 through 4 Mar 2016

What I’m reading 13 Feb 2016 through 20 Feb 2016

What I’m reading 27 Jan 2016 through 30 Jan 2016

What I’m reading 18 Jan 2016 through 25 Jan 2016

What I’m reading 15 Jan 2016 through 17 Jan 2016

What I’m reading 9 Jan 2016

  • Kathleen Fitzpatrick – The Pleasure of the Blog: e Early Novel, the Serial, and the Narrative Archive – – (DH #en3177 en3177 )
  • Jan Schmidt – Blogging Practices: An Analytical Framework – "This article proposes a general model to analyze and compare different uses of the blog format. Based on ideas from sociological structuration theory, as well as on existing blog research, it argues that individual usage episodes are framed by three structural dimensions of rules, relations, and code, which in turn are constantly (re)produced in social action. As a result, ‘‘communities of blogging practices’’ emerge-that is, groups of people who share certain routines and expectations about the use of blogs as a tool for information, identity, and relationship management. This analytical framework can be the basis for systematic comparative and longi- tudinal studies that will further understanding of similarities and differences in blog- ging practices. – (#en3177 blogging analysis literacy )
  • I am a blogging researcher: Motivations for blogging in a scholarly context | Kjellberg | First Monday – The number of scholarly blogs on the Web is increasing. In this article, a group of researchers are asked to describe the functions that their blogs serve for them as researchers. The results show that their blogging is motivated by the possibility to share knowledge, that the blog aids creativity, and that it provides a feeling of being connected in their work as researchers. In particular, the blog serves as a creative catalyst in the work of the researchers, where writing forms a large part, which is not as prominent as a motivation in other professional blogs. In addition, the analysis brings out the blog’s combination of functions and the possibility it offers to reach multiple audiences as a motivating factor that makes the blog different from other kinds of communication in scholarly contexts. – (DH #en3177 blogging research2.0 ethnography )